Depression

Resource Articles

Depression is a mood disorder, one with which virtually everyone is familiar. According to Stewart H. Reiter, M.D. clinical director of Summit Psychiatric and Counseling Associates in Summit, New Jersey, depression can be “a very normal and natural mood that we all experience from time to time”.

Almost all of us have, at some point, felt depressed over such stressful events as job change, illness, or a death in the family. Usually depression at this level is not long lived or severe. It may temporarily affect concentration and performance at work. But depression, as most people know it, isn't a persistent state that results in dysfunction. Depression becomes problematic when it persists.

The Good News
Correct diagnosis and appropriate treatment can help between 80% and 90% of those suffering from depression, according to the National Institute for Mental Health (NIMH).

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Get Started

We're Here to Help

If you're a Cascade Centers member you can get help right away by signing into EAP Member Site...

Member Log In:  EAP Member Site


Or contact us directly...

Call:  800-433-2320Text:  503-850-7721
Email:  info@cascadecenters.com
 
 

Learn More

Frequently Asked Questions

How will the EAP help?

Often life has so many stressors and problems we don't know where to start.

The EAP counselor can sit down with you and help:

• Identify and define stressors and problems
• Prioritize concerns in terms of immediacy and severity
• Develop an action plan and problem–solve
• Help facilitate referrals as needed
• Identify resources within your community
• Provide support and motivation

Our EAP counselors are experts in human behavior change who join with you to help reach your goals.

We all have histories leading to our current situation. As history cannot be changed our EAP professionals focus on making changes in the present for a better tomorrow.

Cascade's 24–hour everyday Crisis Line is staffed by experienced crisis counselors. You can access help by dialing 800–433–2320. Our counselors will assist you in handling the immediate crisis and make plans for follow–up assistance.

The Line is our general mental health information service that allows you to speak with a counselor. It is interactive allowing you to ask for clarifications or more information to your questions and allows us to tailor responses to your special concerns.

Can you select your counselor?

Yes. If you have a specific counselor you wish to see, you may request that person.

Want to change counselors?

Call us back and explain your concern. We will attempt to schedule an appointment with another counselor who better meets your needs.

What happens during the first session?

You should be prepared to give the counselor some background information at this session. This assists your counselor in placing your concern in context and both of you in formulating an action plan. Many people find it helpful to prepare a written list of things they wish to discuss at each session.

How do I know when I need to use the EAP?

• You've tried various solutions, and none seem to work.
• The situation is affecting your work and your relationship with others.
• You are preoccupied with the problem.
• You know something is wrong, but you can't seem to identify the nature of the problem.
• You are having physical signs of stress including headaches, upset stomach, insomnia, etc.
• You need an objective point of view about a problem.

How do I access the EAP?

Call our toll free 1–800–433–2320 number anytime.

For a life–threatening situation, you will receive help immediately. For other situations, you will be offered an appointment with one of our EAP professionals within 48 hours of your call. All of our EAP professionals have a variety of times available for scheduling, including evening hours.

A courteous and caring EAP staff member will answer and help by answering questions, listening, or setting up an office appointment.

We will ask you:

• Your name
• Are you the employee or dependent
• If you are a dependent, who is the employee
• Name of the company with the EAP
• Where do you live (city and state)
• A 1–2 word description of the problem (i.e. marital, stress, anger, parenting)
• We will take some basic demographic information
• We will then connect you with an EAP professional
• Cascade will immediately contact the counselor and give your name and contact number. The counselor will call and set up a time and date for the first appointment.

What can I expect during my first visit?

We suggest that you arrive for your appointment about 15 minutes earlier than the scheduled time. This allows you to complete required paperwork and save your time for the visit itself. The EAP professional will discuss confidentially limits, and their policies and procedures for such things as scheduling and telephone calls. They will then ask you about your home or workplace concern. They will conduct a brief social history including drug/alcohol use, legal problems, education, and current stressors.

Feel free to ask questions of the EAP professional including: education, background and training; how do they work with clients; how often do they see clients; how much experience do they have working with your particular concern; do they use homework, etc.

Our EAP Professionals:

• Are licensed in the state(s) in which they practice
• Have a minimum of a masters degree in psychology, counseling, social work, mental health nurse practitioner, marriage and family counseling
• Have a minimum of fours years post–masters experience in their chosen field
• Have experience and understanding of the EAP
• Are familiar with resources available within their communities
• Are located throughout the United States
• Practice brief solution–focused counseling
• Make referrals based on needs, insurance coverage, financial considerations and best practice standards

What is the difference between a Self–Referral and a Supervisor Referral?

A Self–Referral is when you contact the EAP on your own. When this occurs, no one else knows about your contact. Most EAP contacts are Self–Referrals.

A Supervisor Referral may occur when an employee demonstrates a pattern of declining job performance or has been involved in a serious job incident.

Participation in the EAP is still voluntary.

The EAP Counselor will report back to the supervisor only the following information (unless otherwise requested by the client):

• Whether the appointment was kept
• Whether or not any recommendations were made
• Whether or not the employee has followed recommendations to completion

No specific information about the individual case is discussed with the supervisor.

Sometimes a supervisor may recommend that an employee make a self–referral. This situation is not the same as a direct Management or Supervisor Referral and does not follow the procedures outlined above for a Supervisor Referral.

Get Started

We're Here to Help

If you're a Cascade Centers member you can get help right away by signing into EAP Member Site...

 Member Log In:  EAP Member Site


Or contact us directly...

 Call:  800-433-2320 Text:  503-850-7721
 Email:  info@cascadecenters.com
 
 

Employee Assistance Program Confidentiality

The service is confidential. No information will be released without the client's written permission.

If you use EAP services, no one at work will know unless you tell them yourself.

If a family member uses the EAP, would the employee find out?
Not unless the person tells you. The privacy and confidentially of family members is just as important as the confidentially of the covered employee. In the case of children, many states allow adolescents to obtain healthcare services legally without the consent of the parents. (The age at which this is possible varies.) For younger children, parents must be included in the assessment and referral process, and would quite naturally know about this use of the EAP.

Cascade provides periodic reports to your employer giving the number of employee and dependents who utilized services by month, general types of problems, number of hours used. Information is reported in a combined format and de–identified. Cascade will not report user information that may identify the client.

Your use of the EAP is confidential. Without your express written permission, no one will know, except in these rare circumstances:

• The abuse or neglect of minor children will be reported to child protective service authorities.
• The abuse or neglect of elderly persons will be reported.
• When there is an immediate danger of harm to self or others
• Under subpoena or court order.
• Note: If you sign a workers compensation claim, you are giving ”blanket permission” to release any and all mental and health records. We will to contact you before we release records.

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